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May 08, 2004

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Hi and thanks for info on using some of my grape leaves- I will try the stuffed receipe. Blanching and freezing is helpful too.
I have been growing grapes for about 5 years and not taken full advantage of the crop, other than small amount of jelly and wine.Very tasty so this will add some variety.
Best Regards,
John

Hi, could you tell me what type of grape would best be used for grape leaves?
Thanks for any help on this.
James

Doesn't matter. We used to harvest leaves from fruitless wild grape vines in the Midwest. Just get 'em early in the season, like May or early June (depending on your climate) before they are tough.

HOW MANY LEAVES CAN ONE TAKE FROM A VINE WITHOUT DAMAGING THE VINE? I HAVE A WILD VINE THAT I PLAN TO HARVEST LEAVES FROM. THANKS, GARY HOWELL.

A rule of thumb in wildcrafting regarding preservation is to harvest no more than 1/3 of the herb from a large group of plants. In regard to leaves only, I read an article on grapevine leaves... http://www.virtualitalia.com/wine/viansa_grapeleaves.shtml It says that picking the 3rd layer (under-layer) of leaves helps the vines produce healthier grapes by allowing more energy to get to them (light, water, food).

I would suggest harvesting 10% or 15% this year and see how the vine does next year. You'll be able to tell if the harvest boosted the health of the vine.

Also, you might try propagating that one vine. http://www.asksomeone.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=5481

Good luck!

Thanks for adding this reply, Kelli. People still come to this post looking for info on grape leaves.

I might add however that often the vines I have found in the wild are not being grown for grapes. In the Midwest the vines just don't bear fruit or the fruit is so tiny it's not worth eating. Here in California, my favorite urban "wild" grapevine grows on a park fence near a public organic garden; I believe its purpose is to attract pests away from one or more of the food plants. It grows on a chain link fence and doesn't seem to be cultivated for fruit.

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This is just a great article. I really enjoyed it.

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